Blogs on Hypnotherapy and NLP in Suffolk and Essex

Manage your anxiety

Managing your anxiety with hypnosis and NLP

Anxiety is when we fear that something might happen with no guarantee that it will actually happen. Most of my clients for anxiety rarely find that the predicted problem actually happens. It is easy to imagine that the “light at the end of the tunnel” is a train coming in the opposite direction.


How can we stop feeling so anxious?

Hypnosis and NLP combined can help reframe our responses and stop the anxious feeling before they escalate to stopping us from taking action to resolve the worry. 

I will help you retrain yourself to stop seeing massive problems and start viewing them as challenges to be overcome. 

It is possible ..


Call or Text Graham for a FREE CONSULTATION: 07875720623

Hypnotherapy for Anxiety in Ipswich Suffolk

http://hypnotherapyinsuffolk.co.uk/hypnotherapy-for-anxiety-and-panic/ 

Hypno Gastric Band Weight Loss Hypnosis – forget the diet

Dieting a thing of the past?

You may have seen the HypnoGastricBand in the news over the last few years? I was an early adopter of the weight loss system. This new approach to weight loss has been highly successful. 

It isn’t a diet because UCLA research shows mostly diets eventually fail and people just put the weight back on.


This 4 part course addresses why you overeat, motivates you to lose weight and ‘fits’ a virtual gastric band. You notice when you are full and stop eating. You put some practical weight management in place. 

Best of all you STOP calorie counting and getting OCD about ‘pounds lost this week!’ 

The 4 part Course costs £260 and is tailored to you as an individual. As it is holistic if your eating is driven by things like stress, anxiety, boredom, depression, trauma, eating disorder, BDD or anything else we will find a strategy.



Call or Text Graham for a FREE CONSULTATION 07875720623


http://hypnotherapyinsuffolk.co.uk/hypno-gastric-band-hypnotherapy-lose-weight-hypnosis-suffolk/

Stoptober – Stop Smoking Hypnosis Ipswich 

Stop Smoking for good

I am an Advanced Hypnotherapist, NLP and certified HypnoGastricBand Weight Loss practitioner. 

Why is that important for stopping smoking? 

Most people fail to quit smoking because they don’t also address why they feel a need to smoke. New research shows that for long term stopping smoking the best way is a course which puts you off but also helps you keep the weight off. Many people substitute eating for smoking and that’s because they didn’t address what the craving was addressing – is it stress relief, boredom, related to an activity such as having a pint? 

Each smoker has their own INDIVIDUAL reasons why they smoke and I will help you find strategies to address that “need” instead of inhaling 4000 poisons into your system. 

Ask yourself: If I gave you a glass of water with four thousand poisons in it would you drink it? 

So why suck it into your lungs? 


The course is £180 inclusive of recordings of sessions. Text or call Graham: 07875720623

Hypnotherapy to Quit Smoking in Ipswich 

Hypnotherapy and Anger Management

Anger Management with Advanced Hypnotherapy and NLP in Ipswich Suffolk

Anger is a normal, healthy emotion. It has a purpose. However, it could be a problem if you find it difficult to keep it under control. You can learn to control your anger, and you should: anger directed towards a job not done, or a promise broken, is understandable, sometimes anger will express truthfully how we are feeling – but it should never get out of control because it leads to bad or unintended consequences such as a loss of trust or even a relationship. Worst is when it is used as a means of control of others which is not only unfair but also can be the worst form of domination. Anger can be a useful way to blow off steam but should not lead to harm of others – unless in the rare event that we are actually under physical attack.

Dealing with your Anger

Everybody has a physical reaction to anger: But you should be aware of what your body is telling you, and take steps to calm yourself down, because it will generally lead to a better outcome.

Learn to recognise your anger signs

Your heart beats faster and you breathe more quickly, preparing you for action. This is based in the fight or flight mechanism. When we were Hunter Gatherers or Farmers many millennia ago we became hard wired to either fight an adversary or run away. We would pump adrenaline and lash out or run as fast as possible.

An angry response may also be rooted in past behaviour. If losing your temper got you out of trouble in the past, or you “got your way” as a child or teen, then it might have seemed like a successful strategy.

You could also notice other signs, such as tension in your shoulders or clenching your fists. If you notice these signs, then you need to get out of the situation if you have a history of losing control.

Count to 10 .. slow breathing down .. and learn how to anchor a calm state

Counting to 10 gives you time to cool down, so you can think more clearly and overcome the impulse to lash out. Anchoring calm enables you to slow down and think.

Breathe slowly

Breathe out for longer than you breathe in, and relax as you breathe out. You automatically breathe in more than out when you’re feeling angry, and the trick is to breathe out more than in. Anchor your calm state. This is something you can learn to do. This retrains you to be calmer. This will calm you down effectively, and help you think more clearly. Your adrenaline will stop pumping. You will learn that being calm gets better results.

If you lose your temper there will be many times when you do or say something you regret. It will often lead to unfortunate consequences: Relationships break down, trust is lost, at worst  – you could end up in legal trouble.

Most people regret who they become when they are angry and may feel that they: “cannot help it.” However they can and should for their own sake and those around them – there is really no excuse for lashing out verbally or physically when there are better ways to handle the matter.

Managing anger long term

Once you can recognise that you’re getting angry, and can calm yourself down, you can start looking at ways to control your anger more generally.

Exercise helps with anger

Bring down your general stress levels with exercise and relaxation. Running, walking, swimming, yoga and meditation are just a few activities that can reduce stress. Exercise as part of your daily life is a good way to get rid of irritation and anger.

Practicing self hypnosis will help you train yourself to be mindful and calm and learn how to deal with the issue in the best way rather than the worst  way – lashing out.

Looking after yourself may keep you calm

Make time to relax regularly, and ensure that you get enough sleep. Drugs and alcohol can make anger problems worse. Consider asking for help with managing alcohol and drugs. They tend to lower inhibitions and, actually, we need inhibitions to stop us acting unacceptably when we’re angry. Learning self hypnosis is a great way to relax.

Getting creative and Learning new things

Writing, making music, dancing or painting or enjoying a sport can help release tension and reduce feelings of anger. Finding a new project or hobby. Perhaps you once wanted to explore photography or learn a language or write a local history. Many a client has gone on to find a new, enjoyable, and even profitable avenue to explore. Extending skills also makes you more employable. Some clients have set up one person businesses. Channeling energy into something new.

Maybe you want to master a sport more fully or channel any aggression productively.

Perhaps you could join a rambling group and walk for miles, or a book club, and make new friends?

There are many classes available to channel energy.

Talking about how you feel

Discussing your feelings with a friend, or a Professional Hypnotherapist, can be useful and can help you get a different perspective on the situation. Many people go through similar situations but you might find that they are much better at resolving them than you. Borrow their experience.

Let go of angry thoughts

I can help you change unhelpful ways of thinking.  Thoughts and projections such as: ‘It’s unfair,’ or ‘People like that shouldn’t be on the roads,’ will just make anger worse.

Learning to change your thought processes like this will keep you focused on whatever it is that is triggering your anger. When you are mindful of this, and let these unhelpful thoughts go, it will be easier to calm down. You will find that these new ways of thinking and behaving work much more satisfactorily than the old ways. Life is a long process of learning where we should take the lessons from failure and experience and not repeat what has failed!

Try to avoid using phrases that include:

always (for example, “You always do that.”)

never (“You never listen to me.”)

should or shouldn’t (“You should do what I want,” or “You

shouldn’t be on the roads.”)

must or mustn’t (“I must be on time,” or “I mustn’t be late.”)

ought or oughtn’t (“People ought to get out of my way.”)

not fair (“It’s not fair – why should they …)

Anxiety, Fear and Anger

Sometimes when people talk about “anger” what they actually mean is aggression, says Dr James Woollard, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist. “Often when people experience or appear to show anger, it’s because they are also feeling fear or perceive a threat, and they are responding with a ‘fight’ response to this.” “Asking yourself, ‘What might I be scared of?’ can give you a different set of choices about how to respond,” says Dr Woollard. “You might be angry that something has not gone your way. But you may also be scared that you might be blamed or hurt as result. Recognising this might allow you to think and act differently.”

Read more on how to manage your anxiety.

“Managing your anger is as much about managing your happiness and contentment as your anger,” adds Dr Woollard. “It should be a part of developing your emotional intelligence and resilience.”

Domestic Violence and Anger

If uncontrolled anger leads to domestic violence (violence or threatening behaviour within the home), there are places that offer help and support. You can talk to your GP or contact domestic violence organisations such as Refuge, Women’s Aid or the Alternatives to Violence Project. Read about getting help for domestic abuse.

Abuse Trauma and PTSD

Getting help with anger

If you feel you need help dealing with your anger, I can help you to learn how to handle your anger, understand why you get angry, and deal with any past issues that may trigger the angry response.

Anger management programmes

A typical anger management programme involves one-to-one counselling and working together to find the best strategies for YOU. The programme is usually three ninety minute sessions. In some cases, however, it may be over a couple of months.

I offer a free assessment and then you can decide for yourself.

Call or Text: 07875720623

Email: grahamahowes@me.com

Hypnosis for Anger

Graham Howes Advanced Hypnotherapist and NLP Practitioner for Anger Management in Ipswich Suffolk

Pain and Cancer Relief and Parkinson’s and Strokes

Pain Relief and Hypnosis the evidence for Hypnotherapy and pain management

One show BBC on Hypnotherapy and Pain Relief

I am quoting in full as a public service a scholarly article from 2009 on the efficacy of hypnotherapy in assisting with pain management and relief. I would add that NLP is also extremely effective in this regard and also to promote healing. It is also important to empower the sufferer to have a positive attitude to recovery. This type of Pain Relief Hypnosis and NLP is available from me. It can be effective with Back Pain, Parkinson’s and Stroke Pain, Cancer Pain and Motivation for Wellness as well as the other areas of pain mentioned below.

Graham Howes Pain Relief Hypnotherapist:

http://hypnotherapyinsuffolk.co.uk/hypnotherapy-pain-cancer-relief/

Article on the efficacy of Hypnosis in Pain Relief:

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2009 September 25.
Published in final edited form as:
Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2007 July; 55(3): 275–287.
doi: 10.1080/00207140701338621
PMCID: PMC2752362
NIHMSID: NIHMS129985

Hypnotherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain

Gary Elkins,1 Mark P. Jensen, and David R. Patterson
Author information ? Copyright and License information ?
The publisher’s final edited version of this article is available at Int J Clin Exp Hypn

Abstract

This article reviews controlled prospective trials of hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain. Thirteen studies, excluding studies of headaches, were identified that compared outcomes from hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain to either baseline data or a control condition. The findings indicate that hypnosis interventions consistently produce significant decreases in pain associated with a variety of chronic-pain problems. Also, hypnosis was generally found to be more effective than nonhypnotic interventions such as attention, physical therapy, and education. Most of the hypnosis interventions for chronic pain include instructions in self-hypnosis. However, there is a lack of standardisation of the hypnotic interventions examined in clinical trials, and the number of patients enrolled in the studies has tended to be low and lacking long-term follow-up. Implications of the findings for future clinical research and applications are discussed.

Pain that persists for longer than 6 months is referred to as chronic pain (Keefe, 1982). Unrelieved chronic pain can cause considerable suffering, physical limitations, and emotional distress (Turk, 1996). Further, chronic pain is one of the most common reasons for seeking medical care but often persists despite treatment with analgesics and physical modalities. For example, epidemiologic studies indicate that approximately 11% to 45% of individuals in the United States experience chronic back pain (LeResche & Von Korff, 1999), 75% of patients with advanced cancer suffer persistent pain (Bonica, 1990), and chronic pain is the most common reason for the use of complementary and alternative therapies (Astin, 1998; Eisenberg et al., 1993).

Interest in hypnosis for pain management has increased with recent evidence that hypnosis can reduce pain (and costs) associated with medical procedures (Lang et al., 2000), and there are now an adequate number of controlled studies of hypnosis to draw meaningful conclusions from the literature regarding chronic pain (Jensen & Patterson, 2006; Montgomery, DuHamel, & Redd, 2000; Patterson & Jensen, 2003). Hypnosis in the treatment of chronic pain generally, but not always, involves a hypnotic induction with suggestions for relaxation and comfort. Posthypnotic suggestions may be given for reduced pain that can continue beyond the session or that the patient can quickly and easily create a state of comfort using a cue (i.e., taking a deep breath and exhaling as eye lids close). The focus of hypnosis in the treatment of chronic pain also often involves teaching the patient self-hypnosis or providing tape recordings of hypnosis sessions that can be used to reduce pain on a daily basis outside the sessions. In our experience, some patients experience an immediate reduction in pain severity following hypnosis treatment, whereas others can obtain reduction in pain with repeated practice of self-hypnosis or hypnosis sessions.

The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the efficacy of hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain as determined by a review of controlled prospective trials. Studies are reviewed with regard to types of chronic-pain problems treated with hypnosis. This state-of-the-science review includes some recently published clinical trials that have not been included in any previous reviews, as well as a discussion of the implications of the findings for future research and clinical applications.

Controlled Trials of Hypnosis in the Treatment of Chronic-Pain Problems

Thirteen studies, excluding studies of headaches (note: hypnosis in the treatment of headaches is reviewed elsewhere in this issue) were identified that compared outcomes from hypnosis in the treatment of chronic pain to either baseline data or a control condition. Hypnosis has been applied to a variety of chronic-pain conditions including those from cancer (Elkins, Cheung, Marcus, Palamara, & Rajab, 2004; Spiegel & Bloom, 1983), low-back problems (McCauley, Thelen, Frank, Willard, & Callen, 1983; Spinhoven & Linssen, 1989), arthritis (Gay, Philippot, & Luminet, 2002), sickle cell disease (Dinges et al., 1997), temporomandibular conditions (Simon & Lewis, 2000; Winocur, Gavish, Emodi-Perlman, Halachmi, & Eli, 2002), fibromyalgia (Haanen et al., 1991), physical disability (Jensen et al., 2005), and mixed etiologies (Appel & Bleiberg, 2005–2006; Edelson & Fitzpatrick, 1989; Melzack & Perry, 1975). These studies are reviewed in regard to research design and outcomes for each chronic-pain condition.

Cancer Pain

Spiegel and Bloom (1983) assigned 54 women with chronic cancer pain from breast carcinoma to either standard care (n = 24) or weekly expressive-supportive group therapy for up to 12 months (n = 30). The women randomised to the group therapy condition were assigned to groups that either did or did not have self-hypnosis training as a part of their treatment. The hypnosis intervention was directed toward enhancing patient competence and mastery in managing pain and stress related to cancer. Hypnotic training included suggestions to “filter out the hurt” of any sensations by imagining competing sensations in affected areas. Patients were also given instructions for using self-hypnosis outside of the group-therapy sessions. Both treatment groups demonstrated significantly less pain and suffering than the control sample. Hypnosis was not the main focus of the expressive-supportive group-therapy sessions, however, patients who received hypnosis in addition to group therapy reported significantly (p < .05) less increase in pain over time (as cancer progressed) compared to patients who did not receive the hypnosis intervention.

Elkins et al. (2004) conducted a prospective, randomised study of 39 advanced-stage (Stage III or IV) cancer patients with malignant bone disease. Patients were randomised to receive either weekly sessions of supportive attention or a hypnosis intervention. Patients assigned to the hypnosis intervention received at least four weekly sessions in which a hypnotic induction was completed following a standard transcript. The transcript included suggestions for relaxation, comfort, mental imagery for dissociation and pain control, and instruction in self-hypnosis. In addition, patients in the hypnosis intervention were provided with an audiocassette tape recording of a hypnotic induction and instructed in home practice of hypnosis. The hypnosis intervention group demonstrated an overall decrease in pain (p < .0001) for all sessions combined. The mean rating of the effectiveness of self-hypnosis practice outside the sessions was 6.5 on a 0-to-10 scale.

pain management with hypnosis

pain relief with hypnosis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Low-Back Pain

McCauley et al. (1983) conducted a prospective trial comparing hypnosis and relaxation training for chronic low-back pain. Seventeen outpatients were assigned to either self-hypnosis (n = 9) or relaxation (n = 8). The baseline was an EMG-assessment session and 1 week later the patients began eight individual weekly sessions. No significant change in any outcome measure was observed during the 1-week baseline period. Patients were assessed 1 week after the completion of treatment and then again 3 months after the treatment ended. Patients in both groups were found to have significant reductions in pain as measured by the McGill Pain Questionnaire and visual analog ratings of pain. Patients given the hypnosis intervention reported significant pre- to posttreatment (percent improvement in the three pain measures were 31%, 25%, and 25%, respectively) and pretreatment to 3-month follow-up improvement. However, both the hypnosis intervention and relaxation were effective; neither proved to be superior to the other.

Spinhoven and Linssen (1989) compared training in self-hypnosis to an education program for chronic low-back-pain patients using a crossover study design. Forty-five patients with low-back pain were assigned to receive one of the two treatments first, followed by 2 months of no treatment/follow-up, then the treatment that they had not yet received, followed by another 2-month follow-up period. A pain diary was used as a measure of pain intensity, up-time, and use of pain medication. Distress and depression were assessed using the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90). Patients in the hypnosis condition received hypnosis that included a variety of suggestions such as relaxation, imaginative inattention, pain displacement, pain transformation, and future-orientated imagery. Patients were taught to use self-hypnosis and in the fifth session they were given an audiotape to facilitate continued self-hypnosis practice. Patients in the education condition received lectures and facilitated discussion to induce an attitude of self-control of pain. A number of patients dropped out of this study; however, the data that were available from the 24 patients who completed both phases of the study (and therefore received both treatments) showed significant pretreatment to 2-month follow-up improvement on all outcome measures except pain intensity. Further, the post hoc analyses did not reveal any significant differences between the two treatment conditions on any measure. It was concluded that the treatment package was effective in teaching patients with chronic low-back pain to better cope with their pain and to achieve improved adjustment to chronic pain.

Arthritis Pain

Gay et al. (2002) compared the effectiveness of hypnosis and Jacobson relaxation for the reduction of osteoarthritis pain. Thirty-six patients with osteoarthritis pain were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: hypnosis, relaxation training, and a no-treatment/standard-care control condition. The hypnosis intervention consisted of eight weekly sessions that began with a standard relaxation induction followed by suggestions for positive imagery, as well as a memory from childhood that involved joint mobility. The subjects in the standard-care control condition were administered the outcome measures and were offered treatment after their last follow-up assessment. Patients in the hypnosis treatment showed a substantial and significant decrease in pain intensity after 4 weeks of treatment, which was maintained through 3 months and 6 months of follow-up. In comparison, patients in the no-treatment control condition reported little change in pain during the 6 months of this trial. However, although significant differences between the hypnosis and the standard-care control condition were found mid treatment (4 weeks after treatment started), post treatment, and at follow-up, the differences between the effects of the hypnosis intervention and the relaxation control on pain reduction were not statistically different.

Sickle Cell Disease

Dinges et al. (1997) enrolled 37 children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) who reported experiencing episodes of vaso-occlusive pain into a prospective 2-year treatment protocol. A pre- and post experimental design was used and participants were asked to complete daily diaries during 4 months of baseline and during the 18 months of treatment that involved weekly (for the first 6 months), bimonthly (for the next 6 months), and once every 3 weeks (for the final 6 months) cognitive-behavioural intervention that centred on self-hypnosis training and practice. The hypnosis intervention included suggestions for ideomotor responses (e.g., hands moving together, arm becoming lighter and rising) and encouragement to develop individualised metaphors and self-suggestions to use for pain management. Results indicated the self-hypnosis intervention was associated with a significant reduction in the number of pain days. There were significant baseline versus treatment phase differences observed on: (a) the percentage of days during which both SCD pain (from 20 to 11 days) and non-SCD pain from (19 to 6 days) were reported by patients, (b) percentage of days of non-SCD pain that medication was taken (from 6% to 1%), and (c) percentage of “bad sleep nights” on non-SCD pain days (from 8% to 2%). No significant changes were found in the percentage of days of SCD pain that medication was taken or on the percentage of bad sleep nights on SCD pain days, however. The authors concluded that the overall reduction in pain frequency was due to the elimination of less severe episodes of pain.

Temporomandibular Pain

Temporomandibular disorder can be associated with chronic pain related to dysfunction of the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint, or both. Simon and Lewis (2000) examined the effectiveness of hypnosis on temporomandibular pain disorder in 28 patients. Measures of pain symptoms (pain intensity, duration, and frequency) were assessed on four separate occasions: during wait list, before treatment, after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. The hypnosis intervention consisted of education about hypnosis and five sessions that involved an eye-closure induction, relaxation imagery, suggestions for limb catalepsy, metaphors, suggestions for hypnotic analgesia and anaesthesia suggestions, and suggestions that muscle tension would serve as a cue for relaxation. Patients were also instructed to practice self-hypnosis daily with audiotaped recordings of the hypnotic treatment. The results indicated a significant decrease in pain frequency (p < .001), pain duration (p < .001), and an increase in daily functioning. Analyses also suggested that the treatment gains were maintained for 6 months after treatment with reduced pain and improved daily functioning.

Winocur et al. (2002) compared “hypnorelaxation” to the use of an occlusal appliance or an education and advice condition for the treatment of temporomandibular pain. The study sample consisted of 40 female patients who were randomly assigned to the three treatment groups: (a) hypnorelaxation (n = 15); (b) occlusal appliance (n = 15); and (c) education/advice (n = 10). The hypnorelaxation intervention included progressive muscle relaxation suggestions and self-hypnosis training for relaxation of facial muscles. Patients in the occlusal appliance condition were provided with a full-coverage, hard acrylic appliance constructed to fit the maxillary arch. Patients assigned to the education and advice condition were provided with recommendations regarding how to manage activities and diet in order to better manage pain. Pain intensity (current and worst) was assessed before and after treatment using visual analog ratings. Both active treatment modes (hypnorelaxation and occlusal appliance) were more effective than education/advice in alleviating sensitivity to palpation. However, only patients in the hypnosis condition (not the occlusal appliance condition) reported significantly greater decreases in pain intensity: 57% reduction for current pain intensity and 51% reduction for worst pain intensity compared to patients in the education/advice condition.

Fibromyalgia

In a controlled study, Haanen et al. (1991) randomly assigned 40 patients with fibromyalgia to groups that received either eight 1-hour sessions of hypnotherapy with a self-hypnosis home-practice tape over a 3-month period, or physical therapy (that included 12 to 24 hours of massage and muscle relaxation training) for 3 months. Outcome was assessed pre- and post treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The hypnosis intervention included an arm-levitation induction and suggestions for ego strengthening, relaxation, improved sleep, and “control of muscle pain.” Compared with patients in the physical therapy group, the patients who received hypnosis showed significantly better outcomes on measures of muscle pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, distress, and patient overall assessment of outcome. These differences were maintained at the 3-month follow-up assessment and the average percent decrease in pain among patients who received hypnosis (35%) was clinically significant, whereas the percent decrease in the patients who received physical therapy was marginal (2%).

Disability-Related Pain

Jensen et al. (2005) examined the effects of 10 sessions of standardised (script-driven) hypnotic analgesia treatment on pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, depression, and perceived control over pain in 33 patients with chronic pain secondary to a disability. Outcome measures were assessed before and after a baseline period, as well as after treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The hypnosis intervention consisted of a hypnotic induction followed by five specific suggestions for alteration of pain: diminution of pain, relaxation, imagined analgesia, decreased pain unpleasantness, and replacement of pain with other non – painful sensations. Also, posthypnotic suggestions were given for daily practice of hypnosis but the patients in the study were not given any practice tapes prior to the 3-month follow-up assessment. Analyses indicated significant pre- to post treatment improvement in pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, and perceived control over pain (but not depressive symptoms) over and above change that occurred during the baseline period. Improvement was also maintained at the 3-month follow-up. Hypnotisability and concentration of treatment (e.g., daily vs. weekly) were not significantly associated with treatment outcome. However, cognitive expectancies assessed after the first session showed a moderate association with pain reduction.

Mixed Chronic-Pain Problems

Melzack and Perry (1975) examined the effects of hypnosis and neurofeedback in 24 patients who had a variety of chronic-pain problems. Baseline data was collected during two no-treatment (baseline) sessions, and patients were then randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions: four sessions of hypnosis alone, eight sessions of neurofeedback training alone, or both hypnosis and neurofeedback training. The hypnosis treatment consisted of a taped hypnotic induction with suggestions for relaxation, ego strengthening, a feeling of greater tranquility, and of being able to overcome things that are ordinarily upsetting and worrying. No direct suggestions for pain control were included in the hypnosis treatment. The McGill Pain Questionnaire was administered before and after each of the baseline, training, and two post training practice sessions. There was a reduction in pain observed during the hypnosis training (range, 21%–32% improvement; median improvement = 23%), however, none of the observed changes in either the neurofeedback or hypnosis conditions were statistically significant in comparison to the baseline phase.

Edelson and Fitzpatrick (1989) evaluated hypnosis and cognitive-behavior therapy for treatment of chronic pain. Twenty-seven patients with various chronic-pain problems (back pain being the most frequent) were randomly assigned to: cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) alone, CBT plus hypnosis treatment, or an attention control (supportive, nondirective discussions). The hypnosis and CBT treatments were identical with the exception of a hypnotic induction. It is noteworthy, however, that the CBT intervention used in this study included some what might be considered “hypnotic components.” Specifically, the CBT intervention encouraged the participants to: (1) avoid using the “pain” label to describe their sensations; (b) reinterpret pain sensations as “numbness” through the use of imagery (this component, in particular, might be considered as a hypnosis intervention); and (c) monitor and restructure negative self-talk. The results indicated decreases in pain intensity for both the hypnosis intervention and the CBT treatment that were sustained at 1-month follow-up. However, only the CBT treatment resulted in significantly lower pain rating scores in comparison to the attention control condition. In this study, adding a hypnotic induction appeared to have little positive effect. In fact, in this study the CBT treatment minus the induction had a greater effect on pain behaviors. Given the “hypnotic characteristics” of some aspects of the CBT treatment used in this study, this finding is somewhat puzzling. However, this does suggest the possibility that a hypnotic induction may detract from some forms of CBT for chronic pain.

Appel and Bleiberg (2005–2006) investigated the association between hypnotizability and hypnosis for treatment of chronic pain. Twenty-seven patients with a variety of chronic-pain problems (15 lumbar pain, 7 rheumatological pain, 3 cervical pain, 1 peripheral neuropathy, 1 gynecological-related pain) received hypnosis treatment sessions directed at “teaching self-regulation of the affective and sensory components of pain.” The word hypnosis was not mentioned during the intervention, which included relaxation training, autogenic statements, guided imagery for pain alteration and health and healing, and individualization to use images “in a way that is best for him or her.” The results indicated a significant reduction in pain ratings pre- and posttreatment. Measures of relaxation and suffering were not related to hypnotizability. However, changes in pain ratings were significantly correlated with hypnotizability (r = .55, p < .001) as measured by the Stanford Clinical Hypnotic Scale.

Discussion

This review identified 13 published controlled articles that evaluated the efficacy of hypnosis for chronic pain. With the exception of two articles (Appel & Bleiberg, 2005–2006; Melzack & Perry, 1975), the studies reviewed included a control condition for comparison. In each of the studies, the hypnosis intervention was demonstrated to be significantly more effective than a no-treatment condition in reducing pain in chronic-pain patients. Moreover, the efficacy of hypnosis in reducing pain was consistently confirmed for a wide variety of different chronic-pain conditions (e.g., cancer, low-back pain, arthritis pain, sickle cell disease, temporomandibular pain, disability-related pain).

However, there have been a relatively small number of studies conducted for each of the different chronic-pain conditions (in some cases only one study). Although it is encouraging that 13 controlled studies have reported on the use of hypnosis with chronic pain, there are a number of basic research design weaknesses that tend to run throughout most of these reports. The number of patients enrolled in the studies tends to be low, bringing up issues of power to detect group differences. Control conditions used usually have lacked credible controls for placebo and/or expectation. Multiple measures of outcomes are seldom employed as are follow-up assessment of sufficient duration (i.e., long-term follow-up). Thus, although the findings provide support for the general applicability of hypnosis in the treatment of chronic pain, considerably more research will be needed to fully determine the effects of hypnosis for different chronic-pain conditions (e.g., neuropathic, sickle cell disease, arthritis, etc.).

Studies of hypnosis in the treatment of chronic pain have often included instructing patients in self-hypnosis as a way of coping with pain and gaining greater self-control over pain (e.g., Dinges et al., 1997; Elkins et al., 2004; Gay et al., 2002; Haanen et al., 1991; Jensen et al., 2005; McCauley et al., 1983; Simon & Lewis, 2000; Spiegel & Bloom, 1983; Spinhoven & Linssen, 1989; Winocur et al., 2002). This usually includes providing patients with tape recordings of hypnosis sessions and instructions in home practice of self-hypnosis. However, research has yet to determine the importance of and the best ways to provide instruction in self-hypnosis practice. For example, it is unknown whether standard tapes are as effective as individualized recordings. Also, the necessary frequency of practice has not been determined or even if home practice is as effective as “live” sessions. Our clinical experience suggests that patients who are more actively involved in self-hypnosis practice benefit more and may have more long-lasting gains (see Elkins et al., 2004; Jensen & Barber, 2000). In clinical practice, we recommend to patients that they practice at least once a day. To facilitate this, we provide them with tape recordings of the sessions. We also give them instructions for practicing self-hypnosis without the use of a recording. Some patients choose to practice by listening to a tape, and some choose to practice self-hypnosis without a tape; many do both.

Chronic pain is a complex phenomenon that may be affected by emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological responses and a multimodal treatment approach may be important for some chronic-pain patients. However, there have been few studies that have evaluated the effect of hypnosis as an adjunct to other treatment modalities for chronic pain, including, for example, treatment programs designed to increase activity and to reduce the negative effects of pain on function (Patterson & Jensen, 2003). One study compared CBT to CBT combined with a hypnotic induction. In that study (Edelson & Fitzpatrick, 1989), only the CBT treatment alone resulted in significantly lower pain-rating scores in comparison to an attention-control condition. This finding is somewhat puzzling, because some aspects of the CBT treatment used in this study appeared to be very similar to a hypnotic intervention (i.e., the CBT intervention included instructions to reinterpret pain sensations as “numbness” through the use of imagery). However, this study suggests the possibility that the addition of a hypnosis induction may have detracted from an intervention focused on altering maladaptive cognitions. Further research is needed to determine the best methods of integrating hypnosis with CBT and other multimodal interventions for chronic-pain management.

The present review also reveals that there is a lack of standardization in hypnotic induction and interventions. There is a need to more clearly identify the components of a hypnotic intervention to better allow comparison across studies and to differentiate hypnosis from other “hypnotic-like” interventions such as relaxation training. For example, in the present review, treatments such as progressive muscle relaxation and mental imagery appeared to be approximately as effective as interventions that were labeled as “hypnosis.” It may be that these treatments are similar in regard to mechanism of action and effect. Research is needed to determine the efficacy of hypnosis and specific hypnotic suggestions and interventions. Jensen and Patterson (2006) proposed a basic chronic-pain hypnotic-analgesia intervention that consists of the following: (a) a standard hypnotic induction that includes a focus of attention and relaxation; (b) suggestions for alteration in subjective experience of pain; (c) hypnotic suggestion lasting at least 20 minutes; (d) four to seven sessions indicating “brief hypnosis treatment” and eight or more sessions to indicate “hypnosis treatment;” and (e) instruction in daily home practice of self-hypnosis. Greater standardization in hypnosis research protocols for chronic pain would allow for greater specificity of treatment and clearer identification of innovations in the development of particularly effective hypnotic interventions.

The current review indicates that hypnotic interventions for chronic pain results in significant reductions in perceived pain that, in some cases, may be maintained for several months. Further, in a few studies, hypnotic treatment was found to be more effective, on average, than some other treatments, such as physical therapy or education, for some types of chronic pain. These findings are encouraging for an initial wave of studies, but a more sophisticated body of research including larger sample sizes and more rigorous controls would be far more convincing. Further, most studies have focused on how hypnotic suggestion may be used to achieve analgesic effect, but hypnosis may also have other benefits for chronic-pain patients such as reduced anxiety, improved sleep, and enhanced quality of life (Jensen, McArthur, et al., 2006). These targets for hypnosis intervention with chronic-pain patients warrant further investigation. Research to date has been very promising and continued research is needed to fully evaluate the effects and mechanisms of hypnosis interventions for chronic pain in randomized trials and clinical practice.

Contributor Information

Gary Elkins, Texas A & M University College of Medicine and Scott and White Clinic and Hospital, Temple, Texas, USA.

Mark P. Jensen, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.

David R. Patterson, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.

References

Appel PR, Bleiberg J. Pain reduction is related to hypnotizability but not to relaxation or to reduction of suffering: A preliminary investigation. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis. 2005–2006;48:153–161. [PubMed]
Astin JA. Why patients use alternative medicine: Results of a national study. Journal of the American Medical Association. 1998;279:1548–1553. [PubMed]
Bonica JJ. Evolution and current status of pain programs. Journal of Pain Symptom Management. 1990;5:368–374.
Dinges DF, Whitehouse WG, Orne EC, Bloom PB, Carlin MM, Bauer NK, et al. Self-hypnosis training as an adjunctive treatment in the management of pain associated with sickle cell disease. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. 1997;45:417–432. [PubMed]
Edelson J, Fitzpatrick JL. A comparison of cognitive-behavioral and hypnotic treatments of chronic pain. Journal of Clinical Psychology. 1989;45:316–323. [PubMed]
Eisenberg DM, Kessler RC, Foster C, Norlock FE, Calkins DR, Delbanco TL. Unconventional medicine in the United States. Prevalence, costs, and patterns of use. New England Journal of Medicine. 1993;328:246–252. [PubMed]
Elkins GR, Cheung A, Marcus J, Palamara L, Rajab H. Hypnosis to reduce pain in cancer survivors with advanced disease: A prospective study. Journal of Cancer Integrative Medicine. 2004;2:167–172.
Gay M, Philippot P, Luminet O. Differential effectiveness of psychological interventions for reducing osteoarthritis pain: A comparison of Erikson hypnosis and Jacobson relaxation. European Journal of Pain. 2002;6:1–16. [PubMed]
Haanen HC, Hoenderdos HT, van Romunde LK, Hop WC, Mallee C, Terwiel JP, et al. Controlled trial of hypnotherapy in the treatment of refractory fibromyalgia. Journal of Rheumatology. 1991;18:72–75. [PubMed]
Jensen MP, Barber J. Hypnotic analgesia of spinal cord injury pain. Australian Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. 2000;28:150–168.
Jensen MP, Hanley MA, Engel JM, Romano JM, Barber JB, Cardenas DD, et al. Hypnotic analgesia for chronic pain in persons with disabilities: A case series. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. 2005;53:198–228. [PubMed]
Jensen MP, McArthur KD, Barber JB, Hanley MA, Engel JM, Romano JM, et al. Satisfaction with, and the beneficial side effects of, hypnosis analgesia. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. 2006;54:432–447. [PubMed]
Jensen MP, Patterson DR. Hypnotic treatment of chronic pain. Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2006;29:95–124. [PubMed]
Keefe FJ. Behavioral assessment and treatment of chronic pain: Current status and future directions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1982;50:896–911. [PubMed]
Lang EV, Benotsch EG, Fick LJ, Lutgendorf S, Berbaum ML, Berbaum KS, et al. Adjunctive non-pharmacological analgesia for invasive medical procedures: A randomised trial. Lancet. 2000;355:1486–1490. [PubMed]
LeResche L, Von Korff M. Epidemiology of chronic pain. In: Block AR, Kemer EF, Fernandez E, editors. Handbook of pain syndromes: Biopsychosocial perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum; 1999. pp. 3–22.
McCauley JD, Thelen MH, Frank RG, Willard RR, Callen KE. Hypnosis compared to relaxation in the outpatient management of chronic low back pain. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 1983;64:548–552. [PubMed]
Melzack R, Perry C. Self-regulation of pain: The use of alpha-feedback and hypnotic training for the control of chronic pain. Experimental Neurology. 1975;46:452–469. [PubMed]
Montgomery GH, DuHamel KN, Redd WH. A meta-analysis of hypnotically induced analgesia: How effective is hypnosis? International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. 2000;48:138–153. [PubMed]
Patterson DR, Jensen MP. Hypnosis and clinical pain. Psychological Bulletin. 2003;129:495–521. [PubMed]
Simon EP, Lewis DM. Medical hypnosis for temporomandibular disorders: Treatment efficacy and medical utilization outcome. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics. 2000;90:54–63.
Spiegel D, Bloom JR. Group therapy and hypnosis reduce metastatic breast carcinoma pain. Psychosomatic Medicine. 1983;45:333–339. [PubMed]
Spinhoven P, Linssen AC. Education and self-hypnosis in the management of low back pain: A component analysis. British Journal of Clinical Psychology. 1989;28:145–153. [PubMed]
Turk DC. Biopsychosocial perspective on chronic pain. In: Gatchel RJ, Turk DC, editors. Psychological approaches to pain management: A practitioner’s handbook. New York: Guilford; 1996. pp. 3–32.
Winocur E, Gavish A, Emodi-Perlman A, Halachmi M, Eli I. Hypnorelaxation as treatment for myofascial pain disorder: A comparative study. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology. 2002;93:425–434.

Afterword from Graham Howes – Hypnotherapist for Pain Management in Ipswich Suffolk

In the UK I would also point to the work of Professor L G Walker at Hull University with regard to treating aids and cancer with hypnotherapy.

See the webpage below on how I can help:

Hypnotherapy for Pain and Cancer Relief Hypnosis

I offer help with pain relief for Cancer and Stroke and Parkinson’s sufferers.

Call Graham: 07875720623

Email: grahamahowes@me.com

Hypnosis for Exam Test Interview Audition

Hypnotherapy for Driving Test and Exams Interview or Audition Confidence in Ipswich or by Skype.

Why can I help you? 

Because I have worked as an Actor and Salesman with some high powered companies. I have 40 years as an Actor Teacher Writer and Director.

I am a qualified Drama Teacher. 

I have also run my own Theatre Company so have employed people. 

In addition I have years of experience with Hypnotherapy and NLP – even working in Harley Street with Models and Actors and people in the Media.

I have taught trained or directed many actors singers and dancers or helped presenters and journalists.

I have helped many people get that job or pass that exam.
I was able to help one Teacher who had only one more opportunity to pass his oral exam to become a Teacher. He had failed every time even though his written grades were excellent.
This time, I am pleased to say, he passed. He knew his stuff he was just blocked by nerves or stage fright.


I have helped many people pass their Driving Test who had failed numerous times because of nerves.

Thank goodness this time – They passed through learning some simple techniques .
I don’t work miracles I help you realise your potential.

http://hypnotherapyinsuffolk.co.uk/hypnosis-for-test-exam-interview-audition/

Hypnotherapy and NLP for Business people
I was able to help an ex plumber land a big responsible job that he never thought he would get with a multinational oil company.


Sales people can benefit from some simple techniques and close more sales.
I helped one salesman who could never present without blushing.

There are many obstacles to success for Business Owners as well as their staff. Procrastination to name but one. Improving People skills and much more …

I am not a miracle worker  .. I simply help you find out how to achieve what you want.

FREE CONSULTATION Call GRAHAM: 01473 879561 Text or Call:07875720623

http://hypnotherapyinsuffolk.co.uk/hypnotherapy-business/
Email: grahamahowes@me.com

Hypnotherapy for Actors Singers Dancers and Media Presenters Confidence in Auditions and Interviews and tackling Stage Fright

I helped both an Actress and a Cabaret Singer to get beyond their nerves in Audition and Performance.

I helped a singer with crippling stage fright.

When I was employing actors for a workshop I wondered why some were good at auditions and some were not. They were all talented – but the short list was easy.

It was because some came in prepared. They looked me in the eye and smiled. They had Googled me and found out about the project ansd had pertinent questions. They shone in their audition.

The others failed on a number of levels. I took some time to give them feedback – something they almost never get. I did so in the hope of helping them take themselves to the FUTURE short list.

So now I work with people using a combination of my skills as Director Teacher hypnotherapist and NLP practitioner. Mainly because I have been there myself I could truthfully talk of how that actor could get that job, that salesman close that sale, that person pass the driving test or get good grades in the exam.
I would love to help you. I am not Tinkerbell with a magic wand – let me give you 40 years of experience to help you actually realise your potential.
You can see me at one of my practices in Ipswich Suffolk. By Skype. 

Onsite at your place of Work .. whether it be an office or theatre or film or TV set.
Talk to me for free you can email me with your phone number or leave a message by text or speech on my mobile and give me some times to call.
Call: 01473 879561 Text or Call:07875720623 FREE CONSULTATION 

Email: grahamahowes@me.com

Graham Howes ASHPH GHR registered GHSC regulated
Advanced Hypnotherapist and NLP practitioner
Middlesex University and New College of Speech and Drama Teacher of Speech Drama and English (Distinctions)

Hypnosis for actors singers artist writer
Hypnotherapy for Passing Exams Driving Test and Interview Success or Audition Confidence and Stage Fright in Ipswich Suffolk 

Stress in The Workplace – What it is and How to Use it Productively

Talking about Stress at Work by Graham Howes

Stress is one of the biggest killers in the World today. However, there is no reason why Stress could not be harnessed in a more productive way.

Stress is a normal, necessary function of everyday life. There is stress when you must meet a deadline, drive in heavy traffic, or run late for a meeting. Stress is a natural and essential component of human existence, and in moderate doses, stress is even healthy and beneficial for mental and physical functioning.

During times of stress our brain pumps specific hormones and neurotransmitters, such as cortisol and adrenaline. These chemicals are associated with the “fight-or-flight” response in our bodies. This might have been useful when facing a sabre tooth tiger – but we don’t need the feelings of hyperstimulation, anxiety and panic, in most every day situations: such as explaining to the accountant about a minor overspend!

When these chemicals are released they excite our nervous system, increase our blood pressure, make our heart beat faster and raise blood glucose levels. Our senses sharpen and we receive “a short-term buzz”, according to psychiatrist Dr. Lynne Tan of Montefiore Medical Centre in New York City, in an article on stress and mental health, for American Television.

Moderate short-term stress is beneficial because the chemicals released help to strengthen our immune system, improve performance and memory, and encourage positive mood. In all, stress helps us to accept challenges, take risks, and react quickly in an emergency. Our bodies create a burst of energy and “we can feel as if we are ready for anything.” However sometimes this can lead to severe and paralysing anxiety, “feeling stressed out” or even a Panic Attack.

Stress on the body and brain is necessary for us to react appropriately to situations, however, stress becomes unhealthy when the “fight-or-flight” response becomes overactive and inappropriate. The physical and psychological dangers of chronic stress are prevalent and can affect all aspects of daily life:

A human body: “doesn’t distinguish between physical and psychological threats,” explains Jeanne Segal, PhD, in her article published on Helpguide.org – “Understanding Stress: Signs, Symptoms, Causes and Effects.”

For instance, when one is stressed over a busy schedule, argument, traffic jam, or finances: “the body reacts just as strongly as if it were facing a life-or-death situation.”

While experiencing high amounts of chronic stress the nervous system continually releases large amounts of hormones. The brain does not get an opportunity to reach a healthy level of homeostasis or mental equilibrium. Thus, the over-activity and excessive stimulation of these hormones, that are supposed to be used for only short-term instances, can kill brain cells, and cause many other unhealthy consequences; such as high blood pressure, muscle tension, mental and physical exhaustion.

“Chronic stress affects nearly every system in your body,” Segal explains. People who suffer from chronic stress also experience emotional sensitivity, and other physiological symptoms, such as headache, diarrhoea, nausea, restlessness, loss or increase of appetite.
Chronic Stress can also “suppress the immune system, increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, contribute to infertility, and speed up the ageing process.

Long-term stress can even rewire the brain leaving a person more vulnerable and susceptible to anxiety, panic attacks, and depression.

Mindful Hypnotherapy is one modality for retraining the person to use stress in a calm and productive way, to utilise the buzz of adrenaline, and yet to avoid getting into the hyper stimulation of fight or flight or chronic stress.

We spend a fortune on physical wellness and neglect mental wellness.

One related approach is using the NLP process of anchoring  – or training through Hypnosis to use Mindfulness in a constructive way. 

Each person is unique and so is my approach for each person.

Graham Howes Advanced Hypnotherapist and NLP Practitioner Stress Management

About Graham Howes: I was in Harley Street as a Hypnotherapist but am mainly in Ipswich Suffolk. I can offer onsite visits for Businesses for a wide range of bespoke interventions. I was also a Professional Actor and still Teach, Direct Theatre Shows, and Write Plays with COME DANCE WITH ME going on a National Tour soon.

Talk to me for Free on: 07875720623

Email: grahamahowes@me.com

Web: http://hypnotherapyinsuffolk.co.uk/managing-stress/

The Obesity Epidemic – Is Britain the Fat Man of Europe?

“In 2014 62% of adults in England were classified as overweight (a body mass index of 25 or above) or obese, compared to 53% 20 years earlier. More than two-thirds of men and almost six in 10 women are overweight or obese.” Wikipedia

“Results for 2015 showed that 62.9% of adults were overweight or obese (67.8% of men and 58.1% of women). The prevalence of obesity is similar among men and women, but men are more likely to be overweight. A substantial proportion of obese adults have a body mass index (BMI) of well over 30.” Public Health UK

“Obesity epidemic in numbers: A person is considered overweight if they have a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29, and obese with a BMI of 30 and above. In England, 24.8% of adults are obese and 61.7% are either overweight or obese.” according to the Health and Social Care Information Centre NHS Choice.

What are the reasons why we are now so overweight or obese?

Bad eating is a part of the answer: 

My experience as a Certified HypnoGastricBand Hypnosis Weight Loss Hypnotherapist shows the following: 

People eat too much sugar fat and salt contained in snacks and junk food.

Sometimes this is self medication because of Stress Anxiety and for Comfort.

Some people are food addicts and cannot eat just a little of anything but have to binge the lot.

Cakes Biscuits Crisps Chocolate Burgers Pizza Ice Cream are all cited as favourite binge foods.

Alcohol in excess seems the answer at the end of the day.

Some people eat when bored.

Is any or all of this YOU?

That is why you have a weight issue and may be obese.

The diet won’t fix it – because studies at UCLA amongst others show that diets FAIL the moment people get bored and go back to their “NORMAL” way of eating because it is comforting. Bingeing, picking and nibbling or grazing, or addictive eating and misuse of alcohol are typical responses. Because you “starved” yourself you may put on MORE weight.

Some diets are dangerous because they are abnormal to your body.

Wonder Pills and Potions are gimmicks – Shekes are temporary and boring – If I asked you to replace one meal a day with Pineapple you would probably lose weight but get bored with Pineapple quickly.

Any Restrction or Starvation Diet may work short term but less likely long term.

Diet drinks containing Aspartame actually make you more hungry and may be carcinogenic – anyway do you really want to ingest unnecessary chemicals? 

A lot of the nonsense in Magazines and Newspapers is just to get you to buy the publication. Most of it is short term.

Bariatric Surgery is risky expensive and works up to a point – but if you didn’t address why you overeat you may find you are finding ways around the gastric band – I have treated many who have had weight loss surgery and are blitzing food to get past the system!

Actually you really need to:

Understand WHY you overeat 

Use Weight Management and Portion Control


Take a Course of Hypnotherapy such as the HypnoGastricBand to understand your eating and how to control it.

The Course motivates you to eat better and get moving (in a way that you can).

It is Holistic and deals with all the things that drive overeating such as:

Anxiety or Panic or Worry

Stress

Depression

Low self esteem or lack of confidence

Boredom

Trauma or Abuse

Obesity can lead to Heart Trouble, Osteoarthritis, type 2 Diabetes (which is reversible with good eating), Cancer and more ..


I offer a FREE CONSULTATION face to face in Ipswich Suffolk or by Skype or Phone 

Call or Text: 07875720623

Email: grahamahowes@me.com 

http://hypnotherapyinsuffolk.co.uk/hypno-gastric-band-hypnotherapy-lose-weight-hypnosis-suffolk/

Graham Howes Advanced Hypnotherapist and NLP Practitioner Certified HypnoGastricBand Hypnosis Weight Loss Professional CNHC Approved GHR Registered GHSC Regulated in Ipswich Suffolk and by Skype (Previously Harley Street)

How to Treat Binge Eating Disorder and Obesity

How to Treat Binge Eating Disorder and Lose Weight for Good – Weight Loss that Works

Weight Loss with Hypnosis to Tackle Obesity

There is a perception that losing weight is about counting calories, sins, dieting or using meal replacements or taking the latest wonder drug or pill.

Obesity is often seen as difficult to deal with with a sense that bariatric surgery is the only option when the diet counselling or CBT fails.

We have known for a long time that the diet and the attendant obsessions with pounds lost often leads to WEIGHT GAIN. Enough of yoyo dieting or boom and bust! This is a radically different 21st Century Approach – we know the diet works short term and when you go back to “normal eating’ back comes the weight!


Weight Loss is actually a mindset issue.

If you really want to tackle obesity or binge eating disorder  then you need to tackle WHY you overeat. I run weight loss with hypnotherapy courses which include Hypno Gastric Band hypnosis.

These sessions tackle the underlying drivers and triggers of craving or “food addiction”. Actually the overeating is usually triggered, in my experience, by low self esteem, boredom, anxiety, stress, depression, lack of confidence and more. I have seen clients who comfort eat or binged as a defence mechanism who had suffered physical and / or sexual or domestic abuse or trauma.

There are many reasons why people might use food for comfort and they might binge or constantly pick and nibble or graze. These are generally coping habits rather than food addictions. If you recognise the patterns that trigger the cravings then you will stop self medicating with food. There is a sense in which food has become for some like a tranquilliser.

I work with clients to address these coping habits with strategies and by questioning their default thinking processes.

We put in place a weight management approach. The truth is that obsession with small amounts of weight lost or gained is too obsessive and calorie control or starvation or meal replacement or other slimming regimes are frankly BORING.

Weight loss is also almost never in a straight forward downward line: If you go to the Gym and gain muscle mass you will appear to gain weight. You might lose a lot of water at first and then it all slows down as you tackle the fat. This is not failure – you have to recognise that until you find your stable weight and size you will be up and down in weight.

THE MOMENT YOU GIVE UP IS THE MOMENT YOU START PUTTING WEIGHT BACK ON AND OFTEN YOU WILL PUT ON EVEN MORE WEIGHT.

If you assume that you have failed then you will go back to overeating. Actually failure should be a lesson to improve!

The final session is the revolutionary HypnoGastricBand. This is the last session – because I have treated real Gastric Band patients who were STILL trying to overeat because they had not dealt with the Psychological factors of their being overweight or obese.

I have been a Certified Hypno Gastric Band Practitioner since it appeared and have seen many clients with a high success rate because we work together to help you lose weight and tackle the drivers for obesity.

Talk to me for FREE – each person has their own reasons for overeating, and tackling obesity or just being overweight, is about working with the individual.

This holistic approach not only deals with the root causes of overeating but helps you deal with your issues in life – low self esteem, depression, lack of confidence, stress, anxiety, panic attacks, trauma , PTSD procrastination, boredom, addiction or what ever is your particular problem.

If you are a Comfort Eater, Binge Eater or simply cannot seem to stop picking and nibbling or grazing – talk to me.

If you are overweight or labelled obese (BMI over 28) and tend to yo yo diet – talk to me for FREE.

FREE CONSULTATION: Text or call 07875720623 or email: grahamahowes@me.com and I will call you in confidence.

Website for easy weight loss

Graham Howes Advanced Hypnotherapist and NLP practitioner and Certified Hypno Gastric Band Practitioner since 2010

About Graham Howes – Weight Loss Specialist in Ipswich:

I have practiced in Harley Street London W1 – currently I offer this approach at competitive rates in Ipswich or Hadleigh Suffolk and Colchester Essex or Worldwide or Nationwide by Skype. I have a great deal of experience with weight loss and eating disorders.

Hypnotherapy in Ipswich or Hadleigh Suffolk and Colchester Essex or by Skype for Eating Disorders: Binge Eating Disorder, Comfort Eating, Grazing, Anorexia or Bulimia, Food Addiction and more

What Smoking Does To Your Body And How to Stop Smoking

What Smoking Does to Your Body and How to Stop Smoking

“So smoking is the perfect way to commit suicide without actually dying.”
– Damien Hirst

img_4503

It wasn’t long ago when tobacco companies were using doctors in their advertisements to promote their cigarette products. I have seen an advert from the 1950s where a doctor suggests smoking as a remedy for stress!

But the times have changed — and thanks to a greater awareness surrounding the dangers of smoking — rates of smoking in the United States and UK has declined dramatically.  However 40 million Americans, for instance, continue to smoke on a regular basis, placing them at risk for a number of health complications. To learn more about the ways in which smoking affects the human body, keep reading.

The Dangers Lurking in Cigarette Smoke

A typical cigarette contains roughly 600 different ingredients, many of which are toxic. If you though that was bad, though, just wait until you hear how many chemicals are inside cigarette smoke.

Once lit, the composition of the cigarette changes, resulting in the creation of many new chemicals. According to the American Lung Association (ALA), there are approximately 7,000 chemicals in cigarette smoke — far more than the 600 in unlit cigarettes.

Here’s a short list of some of the up to 7,000 toxic chemicals found in cigarette smoke:

Acetone

Anetic acic

Ammonia

Arsenic

Benzene

Bleach

Butane

Cadmium

Carbon monoxide

Formaldehyde

Lead

Methanol

Tar

Toluene

reasonstoquitsmoking

Increased Risk of Heart Disease because of Smoking

Smoking is among the most influential risk factors of heart disease. This nasty habit damages the heart and arteries, increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease.

The toxic cocktail of chemicals found in cigarette smoke strain the heart, forcing it to pump faster while increasing the risk of blood clots. Heart disease remains the leading cause of death, this is something that shouldn’t be ignored, especially if you are a smoker.

Slows Down Circulation

Smoking may also have a negative impact on your circulatory system. When you smoke, the toxins will make your blood thicker (increases risk of blot clotting and strokes), while also increasing your blood pressure and heart rate.

Skin Wrinkles and Damage

This may not be quite as concerning as an increased risk of heart disease, but it’s still worth noting that smoking can damage the skin. The nicotine found in cigarette smoke causes the blood vessels in the outer layer of your skin to constrict and become narrower. This this occurs, it restricts blood flow to the skin, resulting in less oxygen and nutrients. And when your skin doesn’t get the appropriate amount of nutrients, it’s more susceptible to wrinkles and damage.

Increased Risk of Brain Damage

According to a study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, smoking damages the lining of the brain’s cortex, the region responsible for memory and cognitive function. The Public Health study in England also points out that smoking can increase your risk of having a brain aneurysm. This condition occurs when a blood vessel begins to bulge due to a weakened blood vessel wall, causing a potential fatal rupturing.

Increased Risk of Lung Cancer

smoking cessation in Ipswich
You can reverse damage due to smoking

We can’t talk about the dangers of smoking without mentioning its adverse effects on the respiratory system. It’s estimated that smoking accounts for 84% of deaths from lung cancer as well as 83% of deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

These are just a few of the disturbing ways in which smoking affects the human body. If you are looking to kick the habit, check out our help page here for more advice.

Get the support you need to make important life changes. If you would like to complement your therapy with an alternative treatment option (or need a place to start), you might consider trying hypnotherapy.

Hypnotherapy can help you deal with WHY you have felt a need to smoke and replace the smoking with healthy strategies. Whether your smoking is driven by habit, stress, anxiety or whatever we need to also deal with that.

Help you quit smoking for good. Be there for those who want you to stop.
Call for your FREE consultation. No pressure. No obligation. Let me help you understand what this might mean for you. I have used Hypnosis and NLP and have helped many quit smoking for good.

Make a Change with Hypnosis and NLP – Smoking Cessation with Hypnosis in Ipswich Suffolk

Graham Howes Stop Smoking Ipswich or Hadleigh Suffolk or Colchester Essex

BOOK A SMOKING CESSATION FREE CONSULTATION

Call or Text: 07875720623 or Email: grahamahowes@me.com

smoking 7

How to Stop Smoking With Hypnosis in Ipswich, Smoking Cessation, Quit Smoking Suffolk